Tag Archives: Vault

Art Wakes You Up

Walter De Maria, Bel Air Trilogy, 2000–2011 (detail), stainless steel rod with 1955 Chevrolet Bel Air two-tone hardtop Photo by Robert McKeever Courtesy of Gagosian Gallery/© Walter de Maria

 

Reprinted from Culturemap

Sleepy? Lethargic? Listless? Having trouble focusing?  Don’t remember what you did yesterday? Walking around the house in daze, looking for your glasses while wearing them?

I have just the thing for you — art.

Yes, you heard it here first. Actually, I heard it elsewhere first, but I’m the one selling art as the wake-up cure. If all this art-making holds the potential to not only bring something of beauty into the world but also wakes us up, you have to admit it’s considerably more alluring than gulping an energy drink.

I’ve heard it all: art generates cash when we eat out, park and pay the babysitter. Art helps kids learn just about every subject, or at least make it more interesting. And then there’s my favorite rant, art has value, now just get over and on with it.

But when I heard Anthony Brandt utter, with a mischievous smile, “I protect consciousness, what do you do?” during his talk “Why Young Minds Need Art” to an eager crowd of educators and arts administrators at the first Houston Art Partners conference held at the MFAH last month, I thought, well now, that’s a new one. The premise of Brandt’s theory is that art has the power to wake us out of our coma though a process of bending, breaking and blending an idea.

Brandt is an associate professor at Rice University’s Shepherd School of Music and artistic director of Musiqa. He runs the popular Exploring the Mind through Music conferences and likes to hang out with neuroscientists. Later this season he teams up with celeb scientist/authorDavid Eagleman for Maternity – Women’s Voices Through the Ages, premiering with River Oaks Chamber Orchestra on April 21. The guy knows his way around gray matter.

But let’s let the brainy composer speak: “Human minds constantly make a choice — prune neural networks for efficiency and reliability, which removes options and makes the behavior unconscious; or allow redundancy to thrive and promote networking, which offers flexibility and allows the conscious mind to participate,” says Brandt. “Activities that involve drilling and rote learning lead down the path to streamlining; that’s why habits are so hard to break.  Activities that offer novelty, problem-solving and subjective reasoning keep the brain’s options open. That’s how the arts protect consciousness: They fight automation and keep us awake to our experiences.”

Here’s how the three B’s rouse us out of our automated trance: Bending involves a transformation to the original. Breaking happens when we smash up the pieces to make something new. Blending occurs when two sources merge.

It’s no wonder I could penetrate Stanton Welch’s angled offshoots from classical technique in Indigo, during Houston Ballet’s recent performances. In fact, much of Welch’s work bends classical forms to new contours, summoning many a “how did they do that?” sort of experience. Nice, Mr. Welch, keep that up. I wasn’t alone in my accolades; the audience went bananas. We like waking up when it comes to ballet.

Amy Ell, artistic director of Vault, challenged the norm of partnering inTorn as part of her DiverseWorks residency ConTornTion. Bending the rules of aerial dance, Ell twists the rules of gravity as the dancers lift each other through novel uses of rock climbing harnesses. Later in the piece, a trio hanging from the ceiling further skews our perspective by dancing perpendicular to a wall. The founder of “area” dance, the choreographer considers walls, ceilings and floors all reasonable places to dance. “Activities that offer novelty, problem-solving and subjective reasoning keep the brain’s options open. That’s how the arts protect consciousness: They fight automation and keep us awake to our experiences,” says Musiqa artistic director Anthony Brandt.

If Houston Ballet and Vault woke up my eyes, then theCatastrophic Theatre woke up my ears in their recent production of Mickle Maher’s There Is a Happiness That Morning Is,running through Oct. 23 at their Sul Ross office. The entire play rolls off the tongue in rhyme. You don’t want to miss a word. Even the title represents a clever arrangement of words. The set-up of two William Blake scholars facing the aftermath of a night of public love-making on the yard of the their fledgling liberal arts college makes for a rich language feast. Blake liked to mess with the order of words, too. In fact, “I happy am” from Songs of Innocence factors into the drama big time. Maher bends language with a breathtaking originality. The terrific cast has a blast with Maher’s word wonk ways.

For breaking, head over to 3705 Lyons St. to see Dan Havel and Dean Ruck’s Fifth Ward Jam, made possible in part by a 2008 Houston Arts Alliance Artist and Neighborhood Project grant. The public art for the everyman team, who gave us the sucked in house called Inversion, sure know how to smash up a couple of bungalows to show us what breaking looks like.

I found blending in the most unusual place — the 18th Century — as part of MFAH’s Life and Luxury: The Art of Living in Eighteenth-Century Paris.French aristocrats’ savvy silversmiths merged their designs with the food underneath it. Who would imagine broccoli would blend so well with silver?

Bending, breaking and blending are harder to discern at The Menil inWalter De Maria’s Bel Air Trilogy, featuring three red shiny 1955 Bel Air Chevrolets, each speared by a 12-foot-long stainless steel rod, resulting is something new, bent, broken, blended and quite extraordinary.

See what I mean? Nothing refreshes our neural networks like art.

As we continue to quantify the value of art in our children’s lives, Brandt’s thesis may be the one with staying power. Too often, we speak about creativity as a vague, mysterious thing. Clearly defining the territory, as Brandt elegantly did, elevates the discussion. Musiqa will be doing their part in that mission on Oct. 25 through 28 with their NEA-funded school programs Around the World and Musiqa Remix on Dec. 6 and 7.

I’ve often gravitated toward art as a way to change my brain, my mood, or just to jar me into a new perspective. As I traipse the the city, eyes wide open, I see much to keep me awake.

Tagged , , ,

Putting the FUN in arts fundraising

Andrea Dawn Shelly and Spencer Gavin Hering of iMEE Photography by Alberto Serra

UpdateDance Source Houston is the newest member of the Houston arts community to go the way of crowdfunding with their Indiegogo campaign for Weekend of Texas Contemporary Dance.  The show goes down at Miller Outdoor Theatre on Sept. 24 & 26,  but they could use the cash now.  I Just sent them some of mine and I get a picnic as a perk.  Nice!  Amy Ell Vault and NobleMotion Dance also had successful campaigns.  Stay tuned for Alex Luster’s campaign for his street act documentary, Stick ‘Em Up.

Jerry Ochoa of Two Star Symphony reports:  “Our Indiegogo campaign was a success, exceeding our $7000 target (final total = $7220) with days left before the campaign deadline. We spent the next 7 weeks in the KUHF Frank Geary studio with engineer Todd Hulslander and came out with the finished album Titus Andronicus. For comparison, the most time we had ever spent recording an album before this was 2 days in the studio, from start to finish.”  Two Star held a swell CD launch party at Divergence Music & Arts too, along with fantastic reviews.

It gave me great joy to meet Jenalia Moreno and see her film Stitched at the MFAH earlier this summer.  Moreno reports Stitched has been entered in 29 film festivals.  “But my real show season begins Tuesday, when I show the film at a Knoxville quilt guild,” says Moreno. ” I have almost every weekend booked between now and Dec. 4.  On Friday & Saturday the film shows at a quilt show in Stafford. Stitched will be aired on local PBS on Monday, Sept. 19 at 7 pm. The film will be shown in Newark, Chicago, DC, Maryland and Galway, Ireland. In Houston, we are showing it at 8 am Nov. 3 & 10:30 am Nov. 5 at the quilt show in the GRB. We show it again at 2 pm Dec. 3 at the Houston Public Library downtown. ”

Katie Pearl and Lisa d’Amour had tremendous success with How to Build a Forest. You can catch D”Amour’s Anna Bella Eema at Catastrophic Theatre on Dec. 2.

Finally, don’t make a move without checking out Spacetaker’s handy crowdfunding tips.

Reprinted from Culturemap.

Only 22 days to go. Act now. Send your cash. No, I’m not selling a used car, but a chance to finance Two Star Symphony’s recording its Titus Andronicus score created for Dominic Walsh Dance Theater using IndieGoGo, a crowd-funding platform.

For $500 you make the “lover” level, where Houston’s beloved indie band comes to your house. I saw Two Star perform in Walsh’s Titus. They were terrific, as was the score, so this a worthy effort to ensure we are going to be able to hear this wonderful music again.

Where’s the “fun” in fundraising? It’s certainly not in the heap of letters from various artistic directors stacked up in the Bermuda triangle zone of my office. There are new kids in town when it comes to artists collecting bucks for their projects and they go by the names of Kickstarter, IndieGoGoCrowdrise, RocketHub, and United States Artists, to mention a few.

Are these efforts to democratize fundraising, leveraging social media and enlisting campaign strategies to make those elaborate paper pleas for cash a thing of the past?

Let’s find out.

Two Star preferred IndieGoGo’s approach. The troupe proved a huge hit at last year’s TEDx Houston and are known for the classic film scores it performs at Discovery Green. Soon, the band heads to SXSW for a March 15 show.

“We considered several, and found IndieGoGo had a clean interface,” says Jerry Ochoa, a violinist in the band. “It’s so well laid out, too. I like that we can include testimonials.”

Ochoa first became interested in this type of fundraising from Divergence Vocal Theater  head Misha Penton’s well researched blog post addressing the possibilities for fiscal sponsorship. The group’s IndieGoGo page is remarkably comprehensive: you get the pitch, the idea of who they are, along with review clips and a video. Perks include a special cuddle offer for any angels who want to donate $10,000. Because Two Star is raising money for a recording, any amount would be a help.

Dianne Debicella, program director fiscal sponsorship at Fractured Atlas, has her eye on this trend. Fractured Atlas, a New York-based art infrastructure organization, offers fiscal sponsorship, its own fundraising platform and a special partnership with IndieGoGo, which allows donors to take a tax deduction.

“Most of these platforms are for profit companies,” Debicella says.

Big goals, big results

She’s right, Kickstarter raised over $20 million for projects so far. This is a growth industry. Debicella, along with IndieGoGo founder Danae Ringelmann, will be presenting Fundraising in a Box: Crowdsourcing Microgrants at SXSW’s Interactive and a Fiscal Sponsorship & Crowdfunding Info Session on March 10 at Spacetaker (a new member of Fractured Atlas’ Open Arts Network).

Ringlemann presented a complelling portrait of IndieGoGo’s story recently at a SWAMP workshop for filmmakers. Compelling? Fundraising? Yes, that’s the point.

Your project has meaning to you and your fan base, which wants to be a part of the things they love.

“People contribute to people, not just ideas,” says Ringlemann, who shared her own moving epiphany about the disappointment of old school fundraising.

Not all platforms are alike. All you need is an idea at IndieGoGo, but they want you to put in some elbow grease with something they call DIWO (Do it with Others), which means you do your part using the integrated social media tools. That’s the best way to end up on their homepage orblog. Houston filmmakers Jenalia Moreno and Nancy Sarnoff want to finish their documentary Stitched, which offers a glimpse of the lives of competitive quilt makers at the 2010 Houston Quilt Show. After a fully funded campaign on Kickstarter, they are giving IndieGoGo a go.

“You have to have your tentacles everywhere,” says Moreno, who learned a lot in the first go around.

She suggests three key tips for success: Ask for a realistic amount of money; get your trailer out there; and offer cool gifts. Morena has found the process a great way to connect to fans.

“They leave comments on the site,” she says. “And there’s nothing more exciting than getting an e-mail that we have received $500 from a complete stranger.”

The team has also applied for grants and is considering a fundraising event. “It’s hard to plan a party and edit a movie at the same time,” Moreno adds.

Kickstarter welcomes art projects as well as the creative end of food, design, journalism, comics, fashion, games and technology. It’s not a place for causes or business start ups. With Kickstarter you only get the money if you meet your target goal. That way you are not committed to a project you don’t have the funds for. For anyone who has received a grant for way less than you asked for, this is good news. If a little bit of money is better than nothing, it’s not for you.

United States Artists‘ name says it all. It’s an arts only operation and considerably more selective. Artists must be recipients of their USA Project Partners or other recognized organizations.

Marc Bamuthi Joseph, currently in residence at the University of Houston’s Cynthia Woods Mitchell Center for the Arts funded red, black and GREEN, a bluesslated for a fall performance in Houston. Katie Pearl and Lisa D’Amour, of the Obie-Award winning team PearlDamour, just wrapped up a successful campaign for a new installation of their collaborative work with Shawn HallHow to Build a Forest, which was performed as a work-in- progress at the Mitchell Center.

Inspired by the loss of 100 trees on D’Amour’s New Orleans family home, the piece entails the assembling and disassembling of a simulated forest over an eight-hour time shift. I found the piece captivating, and can’t wait to see where it’s going next.

As recipients of a Creative Capital Award, United States Artists was a logical choice. “It’s brand new. There’s only 200 projects instead of 14,000, and it’s artist focused,” says D’Amour, whose play Anna Bella Eema is on Catastrophic Theatre’s 2011 season.

Pearl and D’Amour deliver a direct but warm talk about their project. “They really encourage a personal approach,” Pearl says.

As for structuring the campaign, they did their homework. “Shorter campaigns are more successful,” Pearl says. “Also, it allows us to have an ending, so we can go back and focus on the piece. It’s really helped light a fire under us.”

The Celeb Factor

Crowdrise has the uber cool Edward Norton behind it and, like other platforms, is wide open. You can raise $50 for a bus ticket. With a tagline of “If you don’t give back no one will like you,” it’s the most hilarious of the pack too. I got an e-mail reading, “Thanks for signing up and because you’re the 709th person within the past hour to create an account we’re sending you a special Crowdrise shower cap. That’s actually not true but it would be great if it were.”

When I raise funds for The Arthropologist: The Movie, I am going to use them for the funny factor. I want to chuckle while I beg for bucks. Nel Shelby, a leading New York-based dance videographer, chose Crowdriseto raise funds for her film Where Women Don’t Dance, which tells the story of Turkish choreographer Nejla Y. Yatkin.

“It just seemed fun to follow the trend and share our project in an authentic way,” Shelby says. “I loved setting up my page on Crowdrise, they have such a wit about them and it made me feel a bit more casual about writing about my film. You do have to market your page and really get it out there so people know what you are up to.”

According to Debicella and Ringlemann, it’s a reap what you sow situation. “The biggest misconception is that you just put your page up and wait. It sounds easy,” Debicella says. “Successful campaigns involve managing your page every day. Like any fundraising effort, it’s work.”

Just maybe, it’s fun too.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Your Body: Power ZZZZs

Paul Taylor Dance Company; Michael Apuzzo in Brief Encounters; Photo by Paul B. Goode

Reprinted from Dance Magazine.

Update: This piece was originally inspired by my time with Houston-based artist Emily Sloan,  originator of Napping Affects Performance.  After her first successful Southern Napstist Convention,  she opens  ShadeCloud at Art League Houston this week.  Expect some napping under the ShadeCloud. ” Bring on the Napture”  is my favorite  Sloan-ism.  Amy Ell and her company Vault perform at DiverseWorks in Houston on Sept. 29-Oct. 1.  Apuzzo has a busy season with PTDC as well.  I continue to marvel at the benefits of the 20-minute nap. I wish all my fellow nappers some quality shuteye.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Apuzzo manages the leaps, jumps, and lightning-quick changes of direction in Paul Taylor’s Brandenburgs without a hitch, thanks to his extraordinary abilities—and, according to him, to the 20-minute snooze he takes between tech run-through and the performance. “It’s such a bonus to get a nap in because this piece is so intense. I really need to get to my power,” says Apuzzo, now in his third season with the Paul Taylor Dance Company. “A nap re-centers my body and mind so I feel completely refreshed for the show.”

Sleep may have more to do with your performance than you realize. Without enough of it, just about every human function is compromised: memory, concentration, learning, coordination, immune system, metabolism, and more. While not a replacement for a good night’s sleep, a nap can refuel your energy battery, buff up your mental faculties, and even boost creativity. There is considerable evidence that short naps improve mental ability in certain areas. Some dancers feel napping indicates weakness or seems childish, but many find a brief snooze makes a marked difference in their energy and focus.

The term “power nap” was coined by social psychologist and leading sleep scientist Dr. James B. Maas, author of Power Sleep: The Revolutionary Program That Prepares Your Mind for Peak Performance. His research brought new validity to adult napping, tying a brief period of sleep into improved perfor­mance. Sleep happens in stages throughout the night, with REM (rapid eye movement) occurring in the later, deeper stages. In contrast, a power nap averages between 15 and 30 minutes, stopping before the cycle completes itself.

“In a nap, we go into non-REM sleep stages I or II,” says Dr. Makoto Kawai, a sleep neurologist at Methodist Neurological Institute in Houston “A nap can help us catch up on mild sleep deprivation. Most people working in the modern world are somewhat sleep deprived. We still don’t know why this short period of time gives us refreshment. But we do know that a shallower stage of sleep makes it easier to return to an awake state, giving us a boost.”

News_Nancy_training_Amy Ell of Vault in Torn

Amy Ell of Vault in Torn; Photo by Lynn Lane

Amy Ell, an aerial dancer and artistic director of Vault Dance Company, manages a busy schedule of teaching at her Houston studio as well as performing and dance making. Aerial dance doesn’t go well with sleeplessness. There are just too many life-or-death details when it comes to rigging and apparatus. “The power nap is my lifeline to the second half of my very long day,” says Ell. She has a handy room in her studio where she will not be disturbed. “My body wakes me up on its own,” she says.
Although there is no ideal power nap duration, most agree that shorter is better. If you sleep longer than 30 minutes, you may wake up feeling lethargic. This is because your body has entered a normal sleep cycle, and ending it abruptly causes a condition called sleep inertia, where the napper can feel even groggier than before. “You enter REM sleep where you actually lose muscle tone,” says Kawai.

There are a few caveats to consider. According to Dr. Aparajitha Verma, medical director at Sleep Disorders Center at Methodist Neurological Institute, what happens during a nap depends on who is doing the napping. “A sleep-deprived person can have REM sleep in a power nap,” she says. This can lull nappers into thinking that they have cured a serious sleep deficit in a brief break. “Adults require seven or eight hours per night to process information, for immune responses, memory consolidation, tissue repair, and to maintain hormonal balance,” warns Verma.

Timing makes as much difference to the benefits as length. “If the naps are especially close to a person’s normal bed time, they may interfere with a good night’s sleep,” Verma says. She also draws a distinction between an intentional rest like a nap and falling asleep frequently during the day. If you are chronically tired, you should consult a doctor.

And while a nap can indeed give a short-term energy boost, it does not carry the full benefits of deep sleep. “Consolidation of both long- and short-term memory happens in sleep, and our reaction time, concentration, and attention span are affected if we are sleep deprived,” says Verma. “All the new information that is learned is not processed well.”

Apuzzo says he notices a direct connection to his performing power, especially in Taylor’s challenging The Word. “The piece requires such a high level of focus,” he says. “I am always glad I got a nap in before I do those back flips.”

 

Tagged , , , , , , , ,